Opportunities

Visiting Lecturer in the Humanities/Ferris Professor of Journalism/McGraw Professor of Writing

The Program in Journalism and its academic home, the Council of the Humanities, welcome proposals from journalists to teach seminars in journalism as visiting Ferris Professors of Journalism and in nonfiction as visiting McGraw Professors of Writing. Positions are available for one-semester terms: fall 2022 or spring 2023.

The Program and the Council share a vision that is both local and global, and which spans disciplines and borders. They view a strong, ethical, and representational press as essential to participatory democracy. They are known for championing innovation, public engagement, collaboration, diversity, inclusion, and access.

Journalists from a range of backgrounds and media are encouraged to apply. Full-time visiting professors take a formal leave from daily journalism to devote themselves to teaching. They must be on campus four full days a week, on average; attend all faculty gatherings; and participate in University life. They give talks, participate in panels, advise students, and join in events.

Part-time visiting professors must spend two full days, on average, on campus each week for the 12-week term, as well as during the week of Reading Period. Part-time professors are expected to attend faculty gatherings whenever possible.

Seminars meet once a week for three hours, with enrollment limited to 16. Students devote about six hours a week to class preparation. Every week or two, students submit assignments, which the professor critiques during mandatory one-on-one writing conferences. Professors often invite guest speakers and arrange a class visit to a newspaper or magazine.

Part-time appointments offer a salary of $37,500. Full-time appointments offer a salary of $75,000. Former visiting professors are eligible to propose seminars that include a class trip over fall or spring break (subject to University travel policies at the time) during which students conduct reporting off-campus in a domestic or international location. These professors receive a salary of $90,000 and are expected to be “in residence,” relocating to Princeton or the local vicinity for the semester.

Applications must be received via AHIRE by 11:59 p.m. EST on Wednesday, October 13, 2021. The selection committee aims to complete its work by February 2022.

Applicants should submit a résumé or CV that includes recent publications; a proposal for a seminar; and a cover letter that describes their interest in teaching.

Innovative and cross-disciplinary proposals are encouraged. Many seminars fall under one of these broad course rubrics:

  • The Literature of Fact
  • Investigative Journalism
  • Writing about Racial Justice
  • Data Journalism
  • Writing about the Environment
  • Covering Politics
  • International News
  • Audio Journalism
  • Visual Journalism
  • Writing about (Culture, Film, Ideas, Law, etc.)

Seminar proposals should include:

  • One or two paragraphs about the focus of the course
  • A short course description for the course catalog (75 words)
  • Specific topics for each of the 12 weeks of the course
  • A sample reading list of no more than six titles (books, articles, websites, etc.)
  • Possible writing assignments (typically 5-8 short pieces, one of which might be developed into a longer project to be submitted during Reading Period)

Essential Qualifications:

  • Applicants should have achieved distinction in journalism or other kinds of nonfiction writing
  • Must be able to communicate their experience effectively to students, peers, and members of the community
  • Must be a practicing journalist–a reporter, editor, producer, photographer, critic, or documentarian
  • Must have at least five years’ experience working at a news organization or writing regularly for major publications, including in the year immediately prior to submitting application
  • Must not have a tenure-track or administrative position at an academic institution
  • Must have a bachelor’s degree or equivalent experience

The application for these positions can be found at:
https://www.princeton.edu/acad-positions/position/21821

Questions may be addressed to Margo Bresnen, Journalism Program Manager, at mbresnen@princeton.edu or 609-258-9948.

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Ferris Summer Grants for Student Internships in Journalism

Ferris Summer Grants for Student Internships in Journalism are funded by the endowment of Edwin F. Ferris, Class of 1899, to support summer internships in writing, publishing and journalism, in both print and digital media. The goal is to help students acquire experience in news organizations and in companies that publish books, magazines or journals.

In Summer 2021, this funding will be awarded only for internships that will be conducted in accordance with the Office of International Programs’ Summer 2021 Travel GuidelinesNo funding is available or may be used for any international travel. Undergraduates may be permitted to undertake University-sponsored domestic travel under certain conditions.

Undergraduates may engage in University-sponsored travel solely within the U.S. either: by submitting, as part of the travel registration process, documentation from their healthcare provider that they meet the CDC’s criterion for being considered at low risk for domestic travel; OR, with approval from their faculty adviser or a University internship program director, attesting that the travel is critical to the academic progress or part of a University-sponsored internship program, respectively.

University-sponsored travel that is solely within a University affiliate’s non-U.S. country of current residence is suspended, except for travel by an individual undergraduate student that is critical to their academic progress, as determined by their faculty advisor or that is part of a University-sponsored internship program, as determined by the appropriate University internship program director. Undergraduates residing on campus for the summer must also notify their DSL of approved University-sponsored domestic travel.

While conducting University-sponsored travel, all University affiliates must comply with University and local, state and national-level public health guidelines.

The Program in Journalism will consider funding requests for up to $3,000 for expenses such as living costs from a student’s summer residence, books not available online through the University’s library services, database access costs and software in specific circumstances.

The program will not approve funding requests for any international travel, visa applications, the rental or use of vehicles, vaccinations and medications for vaccine-preventable diseases and other diseases, the purchase of local phones or SIM cards, and conference fees.

Internships must take place in a recognized organization for at least six weeks (typically eight weeks).

Eligibility

All Princeton first-year students, sophomores and juniors may apply. Requests from the journalism program’s certificate students will be prioritized.

How to Apply

Submit an application through the Student Activities Funding Engine (SAFE).

In the documents section of the application, upload the offer letter from the organization providing the internship. The offer letter should include details of the internship and the amount of financial support, if any, the organization will provide.

Deadline

The deadline to apply is June 30, 2021. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis by a committee of faculty and journalists from the Humanities Council that will review applications and select recipients.

Post-Project Requirement

Grant recipients are required to submit a two-page report after their internship. The grants are paid in two installments: 90% upon notification of funding, and the 10% balance in September, after submission of the report about the internship.

2020 Recipients

In 2020, Ferris Summer Grants for Student Internships in Journalism went to 22 Princeton undergraduates:

  • Francesca Block, Class of 2022, Times of the Islands
  • Ethan Boll, Class of 2022, Midstory
  • Katherine Brubaker, Class of 2023, The Argonaut
  • Josephine De La Bruyere, Class of 2022, Provincetown Independent
  • Sarah Drapkin, Class of 2022, research with Donald W. Burnes
  • Jose Pablo Fernandez Garcia, Class of 2023, Midstory
  • Abigail Goldberg-Zelizer, Class of 2023, Center for Collaborative Investigative Journalism
  • Chaya Holch, Class of 2022, Jewish Currents
  • Dev Jaiswal, Class of 2023, The Argonaut
  • Jimin Kang, Class of 2021, Narratively
  • Derek Li, Class of 2022, Midstory
  • Violet Marmur, Class of 2022, research with Donald W. Burnes
  • Owen Matthews, Class of 2022, SupChina
  • Marissa Michaels, Class of 2022, Midstory
  • Lindsey Moore, Class of 2022, Business Today
  • James Rodriguez, Class of 2023, Public Radio East
  • Amy Watsky, Class of 2021, The Argonaut
  • Michael Watson, Class of 2021, Business Today
  • Anne Jing Ping Wen, Class of 2022, Pacific Daily News
  • Jemima Williams, Class of 2023, Business Today
  • Lydia You, Class of 2022, Tech and Politics
  • Joanna Zhang, Class of 2021, Carnicelli Literary Management/Writers House
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John McPhee ’53 Awards for Summer Projects in Independent Journalism

John McPhee ’53 Awards for Summer Projects in Independent Journalism are meant to recognize promising student journalists and to help underwrite the cost of long-form, nonfiction writing projects of at least six weeks in duration.

In Summer 2021, this funding will be awarded only for independent projects that will be conducted in accordance with the Office of International Programs’ Summer 2021 Travel GuidelinesNo funding is available or may be used for any international travel. Undergraduates may be permitted to undertake University-sponsored domestic travel under certain conditions.

Undergraduates may engage in University-sponsored travel solely within the U.S. either: by submitting, as part of the travel registration process, documentation from their healthcare provider that they meet the CDC’s criterion for being considered at low risk for domestic travel; OR, with approval from their faculty adviser or a University internship program director, attesting that the travel is critical to the academic progress or part of a University-sponsored internship program, respectively.

University-sponsored travel that is solely within a University affiliate’s non-U.S. country of current residence is suspended, except for travel by an individual undergraduate student that is critical to their academic progress, as determined by their faculty advisor or that is part of a University-sponsored internship program, as determined by the appropriate University internship program director. Undergraduates residing on campus for the summer must also notify their DSL of approved University-sponsored domestic travel.

While conducting University-sponsored travel, all University affiliates must comply with University and local, state and national-level public health guidelines.

The Program in Journalism will consider funding requests for up to $3,000 for expenses such as living costs from a student’s summer residence, books not available online through the University’s library services, database access costs and software in specific circumstances.

The program will not approve funding requests for any international travel, visa applications, the rental or use of vehicles, vaccinations and medications for vaccine-preventable diseases and other diseases, the purchase of local phones or SIM cards, and conference fees.

Eligibility

All Princeton first-year students, sophomores and juniors who have completed at least one journalism course at Princeton may apply. Requests from the journalism program’s certificate students will be prioritized.

How to Apply

Submit an application through the Student Activities Funding Engine (SAFE).

In the documents section of the application, upload the following:

  • An official transcript confirming that the applicant has completed at least one journalism course at Princeton;
  • A résumé or CV;
  • Two journalism writing samples (published or class work);
  • A proposed budget outlining specifically how the applicant would expect to spend the award funds (include living expenses, if appropriate);
  • The name of one (or more) reference;
  • The name of at least one member of the Princeton faculty who will advise the applicant on the project from inception to completion;
  • A letter of commitment from the applicant’s faculty advisor, confirming that the advisor will regularly video conference with the applicant during the reporting and writing of the project;
  • A proposal letter of no more than 1,000 words. Subjects that would be appropriate to touch on in the letter include:
    —The general topic matter the proposed article would cover, and why the subject would be of interest to readers and of importance to society;
    —The maximum story that reasonably could result from the applicant’s efforts and, if unforeseen challenges arise, the minimum story the applicant is confident would result;
    —Human sources the applicant would seek to interview, and why;
    —Primary documents and data the applicant would seek to gather and review, and why; and,
    —Where the resulting article might be published and the size of the publication’s readership.
Deadline

The deadline to apply is June 30, 2021. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis by a committee of faculty and journalists from the Humanities Council that will review applications and select recipients.

Post-Project Requirement

Award recipients are required to submit a two-page report on their project and a copy of the resulting article(s). The awards are paid in two installments: 90% upon notification of funding, and the 10% balance in September, after submission of the report and article(s).

2020 Recipients

In 2020, John McPhee ’53 Awards for Summer Projects in Independent Journalism went to five undergraduates:

  • Regina Lankenau Ahumada, Class of 2021, “Religion and Resettlement in Texas”
  • Sophie Li, Class of 2021, “Profiles from Hong Kong’s Pro-democracy Movement”
  • Johnatan Reiss, Class of 2023, “The State of Israel: What Happened to the Only Democracy in the Middle East?”
  • Katie Tam, Class of 2021, “Wastewater Surveillance: Reporting on the Secrets in our Sewage”
  • Oliver Whang, Class of 2021, “Reclaimed Coal Mines in Eastern Kentucky”
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Ferris Prizes for Outstanding Undergraduate Projects in Journalism

Ferris Prizes for Outstanding Undergraduate Projects in Journalism are awards of $250 that recognize excellent projects submitted by students in journalism seminars during the academic year, on any topic and in any medium of journalism, including audio and video presentations.

Journalism professors are invited to nominate the best papers or other work produced in their courses. The selection committee consists of faculty members and journalists. The prizes will be awarded during the summer to projects nominated in the previous fall and spring semesters.

Criteria for Judgment
  • Originality
  • Depth of insight
  • Skill of presentation
  • Contribution to a reader’s understanding of the topic
  • Short pieces receive equal consideration with longer ones
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